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Chiara FALCO - Università degli Studi di Milano

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Chiara FALCO - Università degli Studi di Milano
Chiara FALCO
Curriculum Vitae
Address:
Department of Economics, Management and
Quantitative Methods
Università degli Studi di Milano
via Celoria 2, 20133 - Milano, Italy
Date of Birth: 1986, September 22
Citizenship: Italian
E-mail: [email protected]
Mobile: +39 3478363144
Web: https://sites.google.com/site/chiarafalco86/
EDUCATION
PhD in Economics, Catholic University of Milan - University of Milano Bicocca (Italy)
Thesis: “Essays on International Migration”
Supervisors: Prof. M. Mendola, Prof. L. Pagani
2011-2015
MSc. in Economics, University of Milano Bicocca (Italy)
BA in Economics, University of Milano Bicocca (Italy)
Erasmus Program, University of Vaasa (Finland)
2009-2011
2005-2009
2007
FIELDS OF INTEREST
Development Economics, Migration, Labor Economics, Applied Microeconometrics
FURTHER EDUCATION
University of Milan, Centro Studi d’Agliano (Italy)
Risks and Policy Responses in Developing Countries, Prof. R. Burgess; prof. A. Tarozzi
2015
Georgetown University (Qatar)
Analytics and Policy Design of Migration, Prof. O. Stark
2015
University of Milan, Centro Studi d’Agliano (Italy)
Investment, Saving and Wellbeing in Developing Countries, Prof. O. Attanasio; prof. P. Dupas
2014
Kiel Institute for the World Economy (Germany)
International Migration, Prof. H. Rapoport
2014
London School of Economics and Political Science (UK)
Development Economics, Prof. K. Aniket
2010
PUBBLICATIONS
Falco C., Göbel K., (2015), “Does the desire to remit foster integration? Evidence from migrants in Spain”.
Economics Letters, 137, 131-134.
Falco C., Rotondi V., (2015), “Political Islam, Internet Use and Willingness to Migrate: evidence from the
Arab Barometer”. Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, 22(1): 73-95.
WORKING PAPERS
Falco C., (2015), “Education and Migration: empirical evidence from Ecuador”, Working Paper n. 297,
University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics.
WORK IN PROGRESS
Falco C., Tonini S., (2016), “Particularism as Deterrent for Integration: Evidence from the European
Social Survey”, mimeo.
Falco C., Rotondi V., (2015), “The less extreme, the more you leave: radical Islam and willingness to
migrate”, mimeo (submitted).
Falco C., (2015), “Human Capital and Remittances: evidence from Ecuadorians in Spain”, mimeo.
FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND PROJECTS
Fondazione R. Franceschi, (2015), “Tertiary Education and Human Development in Rural Cambodia:
Exploring the Causal Link”.
Centre for Industrial Studies on behalf of the European Commission, DG Regional and Urban Policy,
(2014), “Ex post evaluation of Cohesion Policy programmes 2007-2013 – Work Package 2: Support to
SMEs – Increasing Research and Innovation in SMEs and SME Development”.
GRANTS AND AWARDS
Roberto Franceschi Research Grant: “Tertiary Education and Human Development in Rural
Cambodia: Exploring the Causal Link”. Coordinator
2015-2016
Merit-based PhD Scholarship by the Ministry of Education and the University of MilanoBicocca
2011-2014
Erasmus Scholarship
2007
CONFERENCE AND WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION
SITES-IDEAS Conference (Italy)
CIdE Workshop (Italy)
FERDI Conference (France)
Internal seminar, University of Milano-Bicocca, UCSC
2015
2014
2014
2013, 2014, 2015
RESEARCH REPORT (in Italian)
Gruppo CRC, (2015), “Le condizioni dei bambini e degli adolescenti poveri” in I diritti dell’infanzia e
dell’adolescenza in Italia. 7° Rapporto di aggiornamento sul monitoraggio della Convenzione sui diritti
dell’infanzia e dell’adolescenza in Italia.
Gruppo CRC, (2014), “Le condizioni dei bambini e degli adolescenti poveri” in I diritti dell’infanzia e
dell’adolescenza in Italia. 6° Rapporto di aggiornamento sul monitoraggio della Convenzione sui diritti
dell’infanzia e dell’adolescenza in Italia.
WORK EXPERIENCE
Centre for Industrial Studies (Italy). RA in Development Economics
Description: research in the field of evaluation of projects and programmes co-financed
by public funds and industrial studies. Main activities: literature and documentary
review, cost-benefit analysis (CBA), case studies, processing of statistical data,
fall 2014
qualitative and quantitative analysis.
Saint Paul Institue (Cambodia). Summer School Program coordinator and lecturer
Description: coordinator of the agreement between Saint Paul Institute and University of
Milano Bicocca on a scientific and academic cooperation programme.
Lecturer in “Development Economics”.
summer 2012
International Institute for Political Studies (Italy). RA in Economics.
Description: research on Climate Change and EU policies. Main activities: literature and
documentary review, policy and political analysis.
fall 2010
ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE
Teaching Assistant in Microeconomics and Public Economics, University of Milano
Bicocca (Italy)
LANGUAGES
Italian (mother-tongue); English (fluent); Spanish (basic)
IT KNOWLEDGE
STATA, R, SQL, C++, LaTeX, Microsoft Office
REFERENCES
Prof. Mendola Mariapia
University of Milano-Bicocca
Department of Economics
P.zza dell’Ateneo Nuovo 1
20126 Milano (Italy)
[email protected]
Prof. Stanca Luca
University of Milano-Bicocca
Department of Economics
P.zza dell’Ateneo Nuovo 1
20126 Milano (Italy)
[email protected]
Prof. Pagani Laura
University of Milano-Bicocca
Department of Economics
P.zza dell’Ateneo Nuovo 1
20126 Milano (Italy)
[email protected]
since 2012
PAPERS ABSTRACT
Does the desire to remit foster integration? Evidence from migrants in Spain
(Joint with Göbel K.; Economics Letters.)
We inquire empirically how migrants' desire to send remittances back home fosters integration at
destination. Starting from a model by Stark and Dorn (2013) in which the aspiration to remit is shown to
induce migrants to acquire costly host-country specific social and human capital in order to obtain higher
income, we measure migrants' integration effort by social participation. Our results confirm the theoretical
model.
Political Islam, Internet Use and Willingness to Migrate: Evidence from the Arab Barometer (2016).
(Joint with Rotondi V.; Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy.)
This paper investigates the relationship between political Islam, willingness to migrate and Internet use by
exploiting the second (2010–2011) and the third (2012–2014) waves of the Arab Barometer. In an effort to
explain individual level willingness to migrate from the Arab world, it investigates the channel through
which the more people support political Islam the less they are willing to migrate. At the same time, it
explores the fact that the Internet could potentially act as a vehicle of political Islam. Indeed, our findings
indicate that there exists a positive relationship between Internet use and individual-level willingness
to migrate, while there exists a negative relationship between political Islam and individual-level
willingness to migrate. The findings indicate also that there is no significant effect of Internet use on
political Islam.
Education and Migration: empirical evidence from Ecuador
(University of Milano-Bicocca Working Paper.)
This study examines how the educational level attained by individuals’ affects their migration propensity.
Using an original 2006 Ecuadorian survey, we implement a Regression Discontinuity Design and we
control for potential endogeneity of the education explanatory variable with the 1977 school reform in
Ecuador. We find that an increase in the educational level affects positively the migration propensity.
Considering both country-specific characteristics and gender differentials, there is a positive and significant
effect both for male and for female. The results are consistent with theoretical models related to migrants'
positive self-selection.
The less extreme, the more you leave: radical Islam and willingness to migrate
(Joint with Rotondi V., Submitted.)
This paper presents a theoretical framework to explain how cultural traits affect willingness to migrate,
focusing in particular on the role played by radical Islam. In our model, more radical values imply a higher
psychological cost of migrating deriving from the fact that connections with socio-religious friends and
neighbors are not maintained after migration, thus deterring individuals from migrating (Mayers, 2000).
We test the prediction of the model by using micro-level data from the Arab Barometer. The results
indicate that, ceteris paribus, more radical individuals are less willing to migrate. This finding is robust to
alternative specifications of the model and to the use of econometric techniques aimed at addressing the
potential endogeneity of radical Islam. The result is also qualitatively unchanged when using aggregate
data on actual outflows of migrants. This paper contributes to the literature on the individual-level
determinants of the willingness to migrate and the cultural determinants of economic outcomes.
Human Capital and Remittances: evidence from Ecuadorians in Spain
This paper aims to find how education is related to the probability to remit (i.e., extensive margin) and the
level of remittances (i.e., intensive margin). Using the Spanish National Immigrant Survey from 2007 and
selecting migrants from Ecuador. Our findings indicate that, after controlling for a wide set of individual
covariates, there exists a negative association between remittances and migrants' educational level both at
the extensive and intensive margin.
Particularism as Deterrent for Integration: Evidence from the European Social Survey
(Joint with Tonini S.)
Immigration is one of the most important and pressing issues in the current sociopolitical debate. In
particular, the presence of a growing number of migrants in many European countries calls for the
development of integration strategies and participation's forms of the migrant population to the European
society evolution. The aim of this paper is to investigate how particularism might affect migrants'
integration. Although the concept of particularism is relatively new to the economic literature, it is rooted
in the sociological field, where it has shown to be linked to widespread informal institutions (MungiuPippidi, 2005) and to higher level of corruption (Lumby, 2006). Following the approach developed by
Rotondi and Stanca (2015), we use the European Social Survey (2002-2014) to operationalize the
definition of particularism proposed by Parsons and Shils (1951). In particular, we consider the difference
between the answers to the question “It is occasionally alright to ignore the law and do what you want" and
the question: “You should always strictly obey the law, even if it means missing good opportunities."
Hence, we consider as particularist an individual, who has a positive difference between these two
variables. Following Stark and Dorn (2013) and Falco and Göbel (2015), we approximate integration by
the extent to which migrants learn and acquire the culture and customs of the host country, hence the extent
of social participation. Specifically, “How often socially meet with friends, relatives or colleagues” and
“Take part in social activities compared
to others of same age”. This aggregate analysis contributes to the economic debate on immigration and
integration, highlighting the role played by personal attitude.
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